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The Impact of COVID-19 on New Graduate Teachers: Tradewind Conference Series

September 2020 by Tradewind Australia

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We recently launched a brand-new Conference Series – webinars designed to focus on the critical impact of COVID-19 on permanent recruitment in the Education sector in 2021. In the first episode of the series, hosted by our Education Learning and Development Consultant Ian McNally, we look at the plight of new graduate teachers who are preparing to enter the teaching profession in 2021. How have they been impacted by COVID-19, and what does this mean for schools, universities and the Victorian Institute of Teaching (VIT)?

A number of esteemed guests from across the Victorian Education sector joined us on the webinar to discuss this important topic, including Jenene Burke, Deputy Dean of the School of Education at Federation University Australia; Joanna Barbousas, Dean of Education at La Trobe University and President of the Victorian Council of Deans of Education; Fiona James, Director of Accreditation and Practice at VIT; Linda Blakis, Professional Practice Manager at VIT; and our Principal Mentor Billy Green.

During the conversation, each of them shared unique insights from their specific areas on how COVID-19 has affected the teaching profession, particularly for teachers just beginning their careers, as well as how training providers and regulatory bodies have had to adapt.

The key discussion points include:

  • The advantages and challenges of this year for pre-service teachers
  • How practicums have been impacted and whether pre-service teachers have been able to meet the requirements to graduate
  • How assessments have changed as a result of online learning
  • Attrition rates in preservice teachers and how VIT is pivoting to ensure new graduates are not lost to the profession
  • Whether there will be delays for new graduates in getting their initial registration approvals in time for 2021
  • Why school leaders should embrace the unique perspectives that these new graduates have
  • How the partnership between different aspects of the teaching profession has been strengthened over the last six months

Overall, the consensus was that, far from being disadvantaged by their circumstances, the newest cohort of teaching graduates will have resourcefulness, resilience and a valuable set of skills they can bring to their teaching practice, ultimately supporting better outcomes in schools across Victoria.

For more details on how teacher training and development has been disrupted this year, be sure to watch the full episode below. 

 

 

If you would like to discuss any of the points further, get in touch with our team of Education recruitment specialists, and don’t forget to watch out for the next instalment of our Conference Series!